charlie rose #metoo sexual assault apologies
November 30, 2017

What Most Current Sexual Assault Apologies Have in Common

This article appears in full on the Huffington Post

As the avalanche of high-profile sexual assault and harassment controversies in Hollywood, the media, and politics continues, a noticeable rhythm has set in: public accusations mount, the man offers a denial or weak apology, and then he fades into the background as soon as the next man is accused.

Before moving on, however, it is worth looking at the eerie similarities between these canned public apologies. Collectively, they expose the mindsets of sexual abusers.

The alleged predators invoke passive verbs, scale to generalities, and employ excuses, producing what usually feels like a disingenuous, excusatory apology, at best.

Benjamin Genocchio, who allegedly harassed 5 women, said, “To the extent my behavior was perceived as disrespectful, I deeply and sincerely apologize.”

This drips with passive undertones, from the qualification of “to the extent” to pivoting to how his actions were “perceived.”

According to one study from the British Journal of Social Psychology, “individuals who were generally more accepting of rape myths used more passive forms to describe the actions of a [sexual assault] than did individuals who rejected rape myths.”

A rape myth is a false permission-giving belief for sexual violence or harassment, such as beliefs that if a person doesn’t fight back they aren’t really raped or that “no” really means “yes.”

It’s no surprise that someone who crosses sexual boundaries would believe rape myths. But it’s troubling when they espouse underlying tenets of rape myths while half-heartedly apologizing.

Click Here To Read The Full Article on Huffington Post

 

Haley Halverson

Vice President of Advocacy and Outreach

Haley Halverson is the Vice President of Advocacy and Outreach at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation where she develops and executes national campaigns to change policies and raise awareness. Haley regularly speaks and writes on topics including child sexual abuse, sex trafficking, prostitution, sexual objectification, the exploitation of males, and more. She has presented before officials at the United Nations, as well as at several national symposia before influencers from the Department of Justice, Department of Health and Human Services, and more. She is the host of the “Sexploitation?” podcast and is currently pursuing a Master of Arts at Johns Hopkins University.

Previously, Haley served for two years as Director of Communications for the National Center on Sexual Exploitation where she oversaw strategic messaging development, press outreach, email marketing, and social media marketing.

Prior to working at NCOSE, Haley wrote for Media Research Center. Haley graduated from Hillsdale College (summa cum laude) where she double majored in Politics and interdisciplinary religious studies, and conducted a senior thesis on the abolitionist argument regarding prostitution. During her studies, she studied abroad at Oxford University and established a background in policy research through several internship experiences in the DC area.

Haley has appeared on, or been quoted in, several outlets including the New York Post, USA Today, BBC News, Fox News, the Washington Post, Voice of America, Dr. Drew Midday Live, The DeMaio Report, the New York Daily News, USA Radio Network, the Washington Times, CBC News, The Rod Arquette Show, the Christian Post, Lifeline with Neil Boron, EWTN News Nightly, KCBS San Francisco Radio, LifeSiteNews, The Drew Mariano Show on Relevant Radio, News Talk KGVO, and American Family News.

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