Overview

This page is still under construction

By Category

  • Negative Body Image and Pressure to Perform Pornographic Acts: As a result of viewing pornography, women reported lowered body image, criticism from their partners regarding their bodies, increased pressure to perform acts seen in pornographic films, and less actual sex. Men reported being more critical of their partner’s body and less interested in actual sex.[i]

 

  • Acceptance of Rape Myths: Women who were exposed to pornography as children were more likely to accept rape myths and to have sexual fantasies that involved rape.[ii]

 

  • Domestic Violence & Sexual Abuse: The use of pornography by batterers significantly increased a battered woman’s odds of being sexually abused. Pornography use alone increased the odds by a factor of almost 2, and the combination of pornography and alcohol increased the odds of sexual abuse by a factor of 3.[iii] Other research has found that pornography use by batters is associated with learning about sex through pornography, imitation of behaviors seen in pornography, comparison of women to pornography performers, introduction of other sexual partners, filming sexual acts without consent, and the broader culture of pornography (e.g. fetishes).[iv]

 

  • Increased Marital Rape: Males who use pornography and go to strip clubs were found to engage in more sexual abuse, stalking, and marital rape than abusers who do not use pornography and go to strip clubs.[v]

[i] Julie M. Albright, “Sex in America Online: An Exploration of Sex, Marital Status, and Sexual Identity in Internet Sex Seeking and Its Impacts,” Journal of Sex Research 45 (2008): 175–186.

[ii] Shawn Corne, John Briere, and Lillian M. Esses, “Women’s Attitudes and Fantasies about Rape as a Function of Early Exposure to Pornography,” Journal of Interpersonal Violence 7, no. 4 (1992): 454–461.

[iii] Janet Hinson Shope, “When Words Are Not Enough: The Search for the Effect of Pornography on Abused Women,” Violence Against Women 10, no. 1 (2004): 56–72.

[iv] Walter S. DeKeseredy and Amanda Hall-Sanchez, “Adult Pornography and Violence against Women in the Heartland: Results from a Rural Southeast Ohio Study,” Violence against Women (May 2016), 1–20.

[v] C. Simmons, P. Lehmann, and S. Collier-Tenison, “Linking Male Use of the Sex Industry to Controlling Behaviors in Violent Relationships: An Exploratory Analysis,” Violence Against Women 14, no. 4 (2008): 406–417.

  • Lower Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Dysfunction: A 2015 study of online sexual activities among males found 20.3% reported that “one motive for their porn use was to maintain arousal with their partner.” It also found that pornography use was linked to higher sexual desire, but lower overall sexual satisfaction, and lower erectile function.[i] Other research has correlated pornography use with “negative effects on partnered sex, decreased enjoyment of sexual intimacy, less sexual and relationship satisfaction.”[ii]

 

  • Negative Body Image: A 2015 study found that men’s frequency of pornography use is positively linked to body image insecurity regarding muscularity and body fat, and to increased anxiety in romantic relationships.[iii]

 

  • Pornography Induced Erectile Dysfunction: Historically, ED has been viewed as an age-dependent problem, with rates in men ages 18–59 as low as 2–5%.[iv] In the early 2000s, the Global Study of Sexual Attitudes and Behavior (GSSAB) reported that the ED rate among men aged 40–80 was approximately 13%.[v] In 2011, among males aged 18–40 the GSSAB found ED rates of 14-28%.[vi] This dramatic increase in ED rates among young men coincides with the sharp increase in the availability and accessibility of Internet pornography tube sites.[vii]
    • A 2-year longitudinal study of sexually active young males aged 16–21 published in 2016, found that over several checkpoints during the 2 years, they reported:
  • low sexual satisfaction (47.9%)
  • low desire (46.2%)
  • problems in erectile function (45.3%)[viii]
    • Another study reported that one in four patients seeking medical help for new onset ED were under 40, with severe ED rates being 10% higher than those in men over 40.[ix]
    • A study on men (mean age 36) seeking help for excessive sexual behavior—frequent use of pornography and masturbation—found that ED combined with low desire for partnered sex is a common observation in clinical practice.[x]
    • A study examining subgroups of men struggling with sexual compulsivity, found that among those who reported seven or more hours of pornography viewing (or seven episodes of masturbation) per week, 71% reported sexual dysfunctions, and 33% reported delayed ejaculation.[xi]
    • A Cambridge University study that was evenly divided between men with compulsive sexual behavior and those without, found that 84% of those with CSB experienced diminished libido or erectile function in physical relationships with women.[xii]

 

  • Correlated to Male Sexual Objectification of Women and Attitudes Supporting Violence Against Women: Among collegiate men, frequency of exposure to men’s lifestyle magazines, reality TV programs that objectify women, and pornography, predicted more objectified cognitions about women and stronger attitudes supportive of violence against women. [xiii]

 

  • Risky Behaviors and Other Harms: For males, increased pornography use is correlated with more sex partners, more alcohol use, more binge drinking, greater acceptance of sex outside of marriage for married individuals, greater acceptance of sex before marriage, and less child centeredness during marriage.[xiv]

 

  • Pornography as Sex Ed: A study of male high school seniors in Sweden found that nearly 70% of those who frequently used pornography reported that pornography made them want to try out what they had seen compared to 42% of boys in a reference group.[xv] Frequent users of pornography viewed all forms of pornography more often, especially advanced or more deviant forms of pornography including violence and sexual abuse of children and animals.[xvi]

 

  • Sexual Harassment and Coercion: A study of 804 Italian males and females aged 14 to 19, found that males who viewed pornography were significantly more likely to report having sexually harassed a peer or forcing someone to have sex.[xvii]

[i] Aline Wéry and Joel Billieux, “Online Sexual Activities: An Exploratory Study of Problematic and Non-Problematic Usage Patterns in a Sample of Men,” Computers in Human Behavior 56 (2016): 257–266.

[ii] Brian Y. Park, Gary Wilson, Jonathan Berger, Matthew Christman, Bryn Reina, Frank Bishop, Warren P. Klam, and Andrew P. Doan, “Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports,” Behavioral Sciences 6, no. 17 (2016): 1–25.

[iii] Wéry, ibid.

[iv] Park, ibid.

[v] Alfredo Nicolosi, Edward O. Laumann, Dale B. Glasser, Edson D. Moreira, Jr., Anthony Paik, and Clive Gingell, “Sexual Behavior and Sexual Dysfunctions after Age 40: The Global Study of Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors,” Urology 64 (2004): 991–997.

[vi] Ivan Landripet and Aleksandar Štulhofer, “Is Pornography Use Associated with Sexual Difficulties and Dysfunctions among Younger Heterosexual Men?” The Journal of Sexual Medicine 12 (2015): 1136–1139.

[vii] Park, ibid.

[viii] Lucia F. Sullivan, Lori A. Brotto, E. Sandra Byers, Jo Ann Majerovich, and Judith A. Wuest, “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Functioning among Sexually Experienced Middle to Late Adolescents,” The Journal of Sexual Medicine 11 (2014): 630–641.

[ix] Paolo Capogrosso, et al., “One Patient Out of Four with Newly Diagnosed Erectile Dysfunction Is a Young Man—Worrisome Picture from the Everyday Clinical Practice,” The Journal of Sexual Medicine 10 (2013): 1833–1841.

[x] Verena Klein, Tanja Jurin, Peer Briken, and Aleksandar Štulhofer, “Erectile Dysfunction, Boredom, and Hypersexuality among Couple Men from Two European Countries,” The Journal of Sexual Medicine 12, no. 11 (2015):2160–2167.

[xi] Katherine S. Sutton, Natalie Stratton, Jennifer Pytyck, Nathan J. Kolla, and James M. Cantor, “Patient Characteristics by Type of Hypersexuality Referral: A Quantitative Chart Review of 115 Consecutive Male Cases,” Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 41, no. 6 (2015): 563–580.

[xii] Valerie Voon, Thomas B. Mole, Paula Banca, Laura Porter, Laurel Morris, Simon Mitchell, Tatyana R. Lapa, et al., “Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors,” PLOS ONE 9, no. 7 (2014):1–10.

[xiii] Paul J. Wright and Robert S. Tokunaga, “Men’s Objectifying Media Consumption, Objectification of Women, and Attitudes Supportive of Violence against Women,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 45, no. 4 (2016): 955–64.

[xiv] Jason S. Carroll, Laura L. Padilla-Walker, Larry J. Olson, Chad D. Olson, Carolyn McNamara Barry, Stephanie D. Madsen, “Generation XXX: Pornography Acceptance and Use Among Emerging Adults,” Journal of Adolescent Research 23, no. 1 (2008): 6–30; Svedin, ibid.

[xv] Svedin, ibid.

[xvi] Ibid.

[xvii] Bonino, ibid.

 

  • Pornography and STI’s: Pornography use among adult males in America is associated with increased engagement in sexual behaviors that increase the risk of STIs. Internet pornography consumption has been positively associated with having sex with multiple partners, engaging in paid sex, and having had extramarital sex.[i]

 

  • Increased STI’s Among Adolescent Minority Females: Exposure to X-rated movies among Black females 14 to 18 years old was associated with being more likely to have negative attitudes toward using condoms, to have multiple sex partners, to have sex more frequently, to have not used contraception during the last intercourse, to have not used contraception in the past 6 months, to have a strong desire to conceive, and to test positive for chlamydia.[ii]

[i] Paul J. Wright and Ashley K. Randall, “Internet Pornography Exposure and Risky Sexual Behavior among Adult Males in the United States,” Computers in Human Behavior 28 (2012): 1410–1416.

[ii] Gina M. Wingood, Ralph J. DiClemente, Kathy Harrington, Suzy Davies, Edward W. Hook, and M. Kim Oh, “Exposure to X-Rated Movies and Adolescent’s Sexual and Contraceptive-Related Attitudes and Behaviors,” Pediatrics 107, no. 5 (2001): 1116–1119.

  • Dissatisfaction with Partners: Research has demonstrated that the more pornography a man watches, the more likely he is to deliberately conjure images of pornography during sex to maintain arousal, and to experience decreased enjoyment of intimate behaviors with a partner.[i]

 

  • Extramarital Affairs: A study found that persons who have had an extramarital affair were more than 3 times more apt to have used Internet pornography than ones who had lacked affairs.[ii] Other research affirms that pornography consumption is associated with more positive attitudes towards extramarital affairs.[iii]

 

  • Negative Impact on Marital Quality: A longitudinal study of married couples found that those who used pornography more often reported lower satisfaction with their sex-life and decision-making as a couple. Pornography use was strongly and negatively related to marital quality over time. “The findings provide qualified support for the notion that more frequent pornography viewing—rather than simply being a proxy for the participants’ dissatisfaction with sex-life or marital decision-making—may negatively influence marital quality over time.”[iv]

 

  • Earlier Sexual Debut, Multiple Partners, and Risky Sexual Practices: Pornography consumption is linked to initiating sex at an earlier age, multiple sexual partners, more frequent practice of anal sex, use of psychoactive substances, and lack of protection against STIs.[v] Bulot, Leurent, and Collier (2015) report that, “All the work done in this area is in fact unanimous in concluding that pornography is a pervasive influence on young people.”[vi]

 

  • Casual Sexual Behavior: Longitudinal research has found that pornography exposure was associated with a nearly twofold increase in the odds of casual sexual behavior. This association was found even after controlling for age, ethnicity, religiosity, education, and gender. Casual sex increases the risk of undesirable outcomes such as physical and sexual aggression, STIs, and unwanted pregnancies.[vii]

 

  • Internet Addiction: Longitudinal research has found that among Internet activities, searching for pornography has the most addictive potential and should be regarded as the most important risk factor for the development of Compulsive Internet Use (also referred to as Internet addiction).[viii]

[i] Chyng Sun, Ana Bridges, Jennifer Johnason, and Matt Ezzell, “Pornography and the Male Sexual Script: An Analysis of Consumption and Sexual Relations,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 45, no. 4 (2014: 983–994.

[ii] Steven Stack, Ira Wasserman, and Roger Kern, “Adult Social Bonds and Use of Internet Pornography,” Social Science Quarterly 85 (2004): 75–88.

[iii] Paul J. Wright, Robert S. Tokunaga, and Soyoung Bae, “More Than a Dalliance? Pornography Consumption and Extramarital Sex Attitudes among Married U.S. Adults,” Psychology of Popular Media Culture 3, no. 2 (2014): 97–109.

[iv] Samuel L. Perry, “Does Viewing Pornography Reduce Marital Quality Over Time? Evidence from Longitudinal Data,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, (2016).

[v] C. Bulot, B. Leurent, and F. Collier, “Pornography Sexual Behavior and Risk Behaviour at University,” Sexologies 24, (2015): 78–83; Debra K. Braun-Courville and Mary Rojas, ibid; Jane D. Brown and Kelly L. L’Engle, ibid; Elizabeth M. Morgan, “Associations between Young Adults’ Use of Sexually Explicit Materials and Their Sexual Preference, Behaviors, and Satisfaction,” The Journal of Sex Research 48, no. 6 (2011): 520–530; Shane W. Kraus and Brenda Russell, “Early Sexual Experiences: The Role of Internet Access and Sexually Explicit Material,” Cyberpsychology & Behavior 11, no. 2 (2008): 162–168.

[vi] Bulot, Leurent, and Collier, ibid.

[vii] Paul J. Wright, “A Longitudinal Analysis of US Adults’ Pornography Exposure. Sexual Socialization, Selective Exposure, and the Moderating Role of Unhappiness,” Journal of Media Psychology 24, no. 2 (2012): 67–76.

[viii] G.J. Meerkerk, R. J. J. M. V. D. Eijnden, and H.F.L. Garresten, “Predicting Compulsive Internet Use: It’s All about Sex!” CyberPsychology & Behavior 91, no. 9 (2006): 95–103.

Adult (>18 years old) exposure to pornographic media is connected with:

  1. Greater acceptance of sex before marriage
  2. Having more sex partners
  3. Rating their partners as less attractive
  4. Being less satisfied with their partners sexual performance
  5. Greater desire for sex without emotional involvement
  6. More sex callousness
  7. Trying to get partners to act out scenes from pornographic films
  8. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex with animals
  9. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex with violence
  10. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex in groups
  11. Going to prostitutes
  12. Greater acceptance of sex outside of marriage for married individuals
  13. More likely to have an affair
  14. Using more sexual terms to describe women
  15. Reduced support for the women’s liberation movement
  16. Less child centeredness during marriage
  17. Reduced desire for female children
  18. Believing that you don’t need to restrict pornography from children
  19. More alcohol use
  20. More binge drinking
  21. Engaging in more behavioral aggression
  22. Engaging in marital rape

Studies Supporting These Points

 

  1. Greater acceptance of sex before marriage

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. Having more sex partners

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. Rating their partners as less attractive

Weaver, J., Masland, J. L., & Zillmann, D. (1984). Effect of erotica on young men’s aesthetic perception of their female sexual partners. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 58, 929-930.

Zillmann, D. & Bryant, J. (1988). Pornography’s impact on sexual satisfaction. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18, 438-453.

 

  1. Being less satisfied with their partners sexual performance

Zillmann, D. & Bryant, J. (1988). Pornography’s impact on sexual satisfaction. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18, 438-453.

 

  1. Greater desire for sex without emotional involvement

Zillmann, D. & Bryant, J. (1988). Pornography’s impact on sexual satisfaction. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18, 438-453.

 

  1. More sex callousness

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. Trying to get partners to act out scenes from pornographic films

Cramer, E. & McFarlane, J. (1994). Pornography and abuse of women. Public Health Nursing, 11, 4, 268-272.

 

  1. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex with animals

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex with violence

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. Increasing their estimates of how often people engage in sex in groups

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. Going to prostitutes

Monto, M. (1999). Focusing on the clients of street prostitutes: a creative approach to reducing violence against women. Final report for the National Institute of Justice. Available at www.ncjrs.org.

Stack, S., Wasserman, I. & Kern, R. (2004). Adult Social Bonds and Use of Internet Pornography. Social Science Quarterly, 85, 75-88.

 

  1. Greater acceptance of sex outside of marriage for married individuals

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. More likely to have an affair

Stack, S., Wasserman, I. & Kern, R. (2004). Adult Social Bonds and Use of Internet Pornography. Social Science Quarterly, 85, 75-88.

 

  1. Using more sexual terms to describe women

Frable, D. E. S., Johnson, A. E. & Kellman, H. (1997). Seeing masculine men, sexy women and gender differences:  Exposure to pornography and cognitive constructs of gender. Journal of Personality, 65, 311-355.

 

  1. Reduced support for the women’s liberation movement

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. Less child centeredness during marriage

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. Reduced desire for female children

Zillmann, D. (1989). The effects of prolonged consumption of pornography. In D. Zillmann & J. Bryant (Eds.), Pornography: Research Advances and Policy Considerations  (pp. 127-158). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

 

  1. Believing that you don’t need to restrict pornography from children

Zillmann, D & J. Bryant. (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In Malamuth, N and Donnerstein, E. (Eds), Pornography and sexual aggression. San Diego, Academic Press.

 

  1. More alcohol use

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. More binge drinking

Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. (2008). Generation XXX: Pornography acceptance and use among emerging adults. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 1, 6-30.

 

  1. Engaging in more behavioral aggression

Donnerstein, E. (1984). Pornography: Its effects on violence against women.  In N. Malamuth and E. Donnerstein (Eds) Pornography and Sexual Aggression.  New York: Academic Press.

Allen, M., D’Allessio, D., & Brezgel, K. (1995). A metal-analysis summarizing the effects of pornography II: Aggression after exposure. Human Communication Research, 22, 258-283.

 

  1. Engaging in marital rape

Simmons, C. A., Lehmann, P. & Collier-Tennison, S. (2008). Linking male use of the sex industry to controlling behaviors in violent relationships: An exploratory analysis. Violence Against Women, 14, 406-417.

 

  • 58 percent of moms think the government is not doing enough to keep kids safe online (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 44 percent said they worry about their teens’ safety when they are online in their bedroom unsupervised, and about one in four (24 percent) are more concerned about what their children do online than what they do when they are out of the house. (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 58 percent of moms believe teens sharing too much personal information is a primary concern. (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • About two-thirds of mothers of teens in the United States are just as, or more, concerned about their teenagers’ online safety, such as from threatening emails or solicitation by online sexual predators, as they are about drunk driving (62 percent) and experimenting with drugs (65 percent). (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 72 percent of mothers have a verbal agreement with their teen – that is, a discussion of what is and is not allowed online(Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 48 percent of mothers admitted they don’t always know what their kids do online. (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 26 percent of moms said they have joined and “friended” their child on a social networking site, but many moms are going undercover to monitor their children. (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • 59 per cent said they check their child’s browser history when they are done using the Internet and 15 percent use a software program to monitor what their kids do online. (Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008)
  • Parental awareness of their teens’ online activities has risen significantly. This year, 25 percent of teens say their parents know “little” or “nothing” about what they do online, down from 33 percent last year. (National teen Internet survey was funded by Cox Communications in partnership with NCMEC and John Walsh and was conducted in March 2007 among 1,070 teens age 13 to 17. The research was conducted online by TRU. http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/…ocs/survey_results_2007.ppt).
  • 41 percent of teens report their parents talk to them “a lot” about Internet safety (up five points over 2006), and three out of four say their parents have talked to them in the past year about the potential dangers of posting personal info. The level of parental involvement is higher for younger teens and girls, although it has increased across all age groups and both genders. (National teen Internet survey was funded by Cox Communications in partnership with NCMEC and John Walsh and was conducted in March 2007 among 1,070 teens age 13 to 17. The research was conducted online by TRU.http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/…ocs/survey_results_2007.ppt).
  • Teens whose parents have talked to them “a lot” about Internet safety are more concerned about the risks of sharing personal info online than teens whose parents are less involved. For instance, 65 percent of those whose parents have not talked to them about online safety post info about where they live, compared to 48 percent of teens with more involved parents. (National teen Internet survey was funded by Cox Communications in partnership with NCMEC and John Walsh and was conducted in March 2007 among 1,070 teens age 13 to 17. The research was conducted online by TRU.http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/…ocs/survey_results_2007.ppt).
  • Teens whose parents have talked to them “a lot” about online safety are less likely to consider meeting face to face with someone they met on the Internet (12 percent vs. 20 percent). (National teen Internet survey was funded by Cox Communications in partnership with NCMEC and John Walsh and was conducted in March 2007 among 1,070 teens age 13 to 17. The research was conducted online by TRU.http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/…ocs/survey_results_2007.ppt).
  • The number one media concern for parents has shifted from television to the Internet, with 85 percent of parents saying that it posed the greatest risk to their children among all forms of media (National Attitudinal Poll, Common Sense Media, June 7, 2006, http://www.commonsensemedia.or…ws/press-releases.php?id=23).
  • According to the NAC parent survey of more than 4,000 respondents, 93 percent of parents stated that they know “some” or “a lot” about where their children go and what they do on the Internet. Yet only 42 percent of high school students — and 62 percent of middle school students stated that they share where they go and what they do on the Internet with their parents (Market Wire. November 6, 2006. i-SAFE Inc. December 12, 2006 http://www.marketwire.com/mw/r…e_html_b1?release_id=180330).
  • 42 percent of parents do not review the content of what their teenagers read and/or type in chat rooms or via instant messaging. 58 percent of parents do. (Parents’ Internet Monitoring Study. June 2005. Cox Communications, The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Netsmartz, December 14, 2005, http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/includes/docs/results.pdf).
  • Teenagers use chat lingo to communicate when Instant Messaging and parents don’t know the meaning of some of the most commonly used phrases. 57 percent don’t know “LOL” (laughing out loud), 68 percent don’t know “BRB” (be right back), and 92 percent don’t know “A/S/L” (age, sex, location). (Parents’ Internet Monitoring Study. June 2005. Cox Communications, The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Netsmartz, December 14, 2005, http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/includes/docs/results.pdf).
  • 95 percent of parents did not recognize other common chat room lingo that teenagers use to let people they are chatting with online know that parents are around including: POS (parents over shoulder); P911 (parents alert). (Parents’ Internet Monitoring Study. June 2005. Cox Communications, The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Netsmartz, December 14, 2005,http://www.cox.com/TakeCharge/includes/docs/results.pdf).
  • 23 percent of parents have rules about what their kids can do on the computer. (The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Study, March 2005).

 

Definition of Pornography:

The term “pornography” is a generic, not a legal term. As noted by the Supreme Court in the landmark 1973 obscenity case, Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15, 20, n.2, the term “pornography” derives from the Greek (harlot, and graphos, writing). The word now means “1: a description of prostitutes or prostitution 2. a depiction (as in a writing or painting) of licentiousness or lewdness: a portrayal of erotic behavior designed to cause sexual excitement.” (Webster’s Third New International Dictionary [Unabridged 1969])

Definition of Obscenity:

The term “obscenity” is a legal term, and in Miller v. California, the Supreme Court established a three-pronged test for determining whether a “work” (i.e., material or a performance) is obscene and therefore unprotected by the First Amendment. To be obscene, a judge and/or a jury must determine: First, that the average person, applying contemporary community standards, would find that the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest; AND second, that the work depicts or describes in a patently offensive way, as measured by contemporary community standards, “hardcore” sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable law; AND third, that a reasonable person would find that the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political and scientific value. (NOTE: Typical “hardcore pornography” [e.g., a website, DVD or magazine] consists of little if anything more than one depiction of hardcore sex after the other [i.e., it’s “wall-to-wall” sex].)

Articles

New Research Shows Pornography Use Decreases Satisfaction

New research is shedding light on the harms of pornography to relationships. A new meta-analysis–a reliable method for combining relevant data from various studies for greater statistical power—examined the impact of pornography consumption on individuals’ interpersonal satisfaction. The paper, entitled Pornography Consumption and Satisfaction: A Meta-Analysis, concluded that “Pornography consumption was associated with lower interpersonal satisfaction outcomes […]

We Agree, Porn Harms Relationships and Here’s Why

On April 5th, 2016, Drs. John and Julie Gottman, clinical psychologists and co-founders of the Gottman Institute, posted “An Open Letter on Porn.” This article discussed the serious threat pornography poses for intimacy and relationships in a powerful and direct manner. Below is a response from Lisa Thompson, Vice President and Director of Education and […]

The Porn Phenomenon and Why You Should Care – Groundbreaking Research

The numbers are in, and one thing is clear: the phenomenon of porn use poses an unprecedented public health crisis in American society. The groundbreaking new study, “The Porn Phenomenon,”  just released several key findings which underscore the necessity of addressing pornography on a large scale. This survey reports that more than a quarter of young […]

“Sexting” and the Dangers of Hidden Apps

By: Irene Neumann The phenomenon of “sexting”—the practice of taking and sending sexually provocative or explicit photos of oneself and sending them to another person via email or mobile device—has taken youth culture by storm. According to a CBS News article that quotes Dr. Kristin Perry, a psychologist and founder of a parenting resource called […]

Why Do People Cheat? The Link Between AshleyMadison and Pornography

Pornography and AshleyMadison are linked in more ways than you might suppose. As many of us now know, AshleyMadison is a website designed to help people cheat on their significant other without getting caught. Recently, a hacking group leaked the personal data of more than 30 million AshleyMadison users, exposing predominantly married men who have […]

Video

Twisting Masculinity: The Harms of Pornography to Young Boys and Men – Gabe Deem, Reboot Nation

Sexual Exploitation: Connecting the Dots in Real Life | Ed Smart | US Capitol Symposium

Sexual Obesity: Research on a Public Health Crisis

Dawn Hawkins on the public health crisis from pornography

What is the impact of hyper-sexualized media on the family?

What are the major effects of pornography on marriage – Joe Beam, founder of Marriage Helper

A Public Health Approach to Pornography

Pornography and the Colonization of Childhood

Pornography Addiction: A Supranormal Stimulus and Neuroplasticity

Long Term Consequences of Pornography Use: Overview of Research

Sex, Identity and Intimacy in a Porn Culture

Other Harms