June 15, 2018

U.S. House Passes a Bill to Ban Child Sex Dolls

Child sex dolls are incompatible with a civilized society.

This Wednesday, the House of Representatives, agreed with that statement by passing a bill to prohibit the importation and interstate sale of sex dolls or robots designed to resemble children. This bill, the Curbing Realistic Exploitative Electronic Pedophilic Robots Act of 2017, or “CREEPER Act,” was introduced by Rep. Dan Donovan, New York Republican.

Should this bill be passed in the U.S. Senate and then signed into law, the United States would join countries like Australia and the U.K which have already created similar laws.

Excerpt of Article Published in Washington Times

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“Right now, a few clicks on a computer can allow a predator to order a vile child sex doll. This is not only disturbing — but also endangers the most innocent among us,” said Mr. Donovan. “Once an abuser tires of practicing on a doll, it’s a small step to move on to a child. My bill takes necessary steps to stop these sickening dolls from reaching our communities.”

Manufactured in Asia and sold at prices ranging from roughly $400 to $10,000, the sex dolls can be custom designed to resemble specific children and “programmed to simulate rape,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, Virginia Republican, said during Wednesday’s debate.

The U.K. and Australia previously banned the importation of realistic child sex dolls, said Mr. Goodlatte, and Amazon announced in April that it would prohibit the sale of “anatomically correct child sex dolls,” according to the National Center on Sexual Exploitation.

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In April, after complaints by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation and others, Amazon removed most of the child-like sex dolls on their website but unfortunately, Amazon still continues to sell hundreds of sex dolls, some of which still retain child-like features.

Sex dolls of all kinds are problematic because they train the user to view people as sex objects with no requirement for consent or sexual mutuality.

As Dr. Maras and Dr. Shapiro note in the Journal of Internet Law, sex dolls “have the potential of altering individuals’ views and perceptions of relationships, ultimately, having them interact with humans as they would with the dolls and robots.”

This is a disturbing factor that would only fuel the current culture of sexual entitlement, and its consequences of sexual violence and harassment.

All eyes are on the Senate now, and the nation awaits to see if the United States will take a stand against the normalization of the sexual abuse and thing-ification of children or not.

Haley Halverson

Vice President of Advocacy and Outreach

Haley Halverson is the Vice President of Advocacy and Outreach at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation where she develops and executes national campaigns to change policies and raise awareness. Most notably, she promotes corporate social responsibility by constructing annual activism campaigns like the Dirty Dozen List, which names 12 mainstream private companies that facilitate sexual exploitation. Her advocacy work has contributed to instigating policy improvements in the native online advertising, retail, and hotel industries.

Haley regularly speaks and writes on topics including child sexual abuse, sex trafficking, prostitution, sexual objectification, the exploitation of males, and more. She has presented before officials at the United Nations, as well as at several national symposia before influencers from the Department of Justice, Department of Health and Human Services, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Croatian government officials. She is currently pursuing a Master of Arts at Johns Hopkins University.

Previously, Haley served for two years as Director of Communications for the National Center on Sexual Exploitation where she oversaw strategic messaging development, press outreach, email marketing, and social media marketing.

Prior to working at NCOSE, Haley wrote for Media Research Center. Haley graduated from Hillsdale College (summa cum laude) with a double major, and conducted a senior thesis on the abolitionist argument regarding prostitution. During her studies, she studied abroad at Oxford University and established a background in policy research through several internships in the DC area.

Haley has appeared on, or been quoted in, several outlets including the New York Times, NBC’s The Today Show, BBC News, New York Post, USA Today, Chicago Tribune, Fox News, the Washington Post, Yahoo News, Voice of America, Dr. Drew Midday Live, The DeMaio Report, the New York Daily News, the Washington Examiner, USA Radio Network, the Washington Times, CBC News, The Rod Arquette Show, The Detroit News, Lifezette, The Christian Post, Lifeline with Neil Boron, EWTN News Nightly, KCBS San Francisco Radio, LifeSiteNews, The Drew Mariano Show on Relevant Radio, News Talk KGVO, and American Family News.

She has written op-eds for the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, FoxNews.com, Townhall.com, Darling Magazine, the Daytona-Beach News Journal, and has been published in the Journal of Internet Law and the journal Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence.

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