December 1, 2015

Sexual Violence Behind the Scenes: Porn Star Accused of Rape

The porn industry just lost another golden boy.

James Deen, a porn actor with “boy next door” charm, has long been a rising star in the porn community. In 2009, Adult Video News named him “Male Performer of the Year.” Esquire has labeled him the “Ryan Gosling of porn,” and Elle praised his support for female sexuality. Even Buzzfeed profiled Deen, in 2014, noting that he has appeared in over 4,000 porn scenes to date.

Deen categorizes himself as a success story. He told Good Magazine “I was in kindergarten or something and I saw porn for the first time, and I said: This is what I want to do. I want to grow up and be in porn.”

From the porn sites to the mainstream press, Deen has been placed on a pedestal as a shining example of success and sexual prowess to which others should aspire.

Until now.

Late November, Deen’s former girlfriend, and occasional co-star, Stoya, set the porn industry back on its heels when she publicly claimed that Deen raped her.

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Stoya stated that Deen raped her despite her repeated cries of “no” and use of their safe word. Shortly after Deen denied this accusation, two other women who work in the porn industry – Tori Lux and Ashley Fires – also claimed that Deen had assaulted them in the past.

Suddenly, Deen isn’t being lauded as a hero anymore…but not because the porn community is actually serious about opposing sexual violence.

Rape is a common theme in pornography. In fact, Deen himself has regularly appeared in the rape fantasy genre. According to the Daily Beast, Deen films “approximately one bondage, S&M, or mock rape scene for every three regular ones.”

Deen even has a history of joking about rape on social media:

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To date, Deen has not been convicted of rape or sexual assault, and merely stands accused. Yet concerns about the link between pornography, permission giving beliefs, and rape remain.

Studies have shown that adult exposure to pornography is associated with believing a rape victim enjoys rape. Porn use is also linked to increased acceptance of sexual violence against women, and to requiring more sexually violent fantasies to get aroused.

In Pornography and Violence: A New Look at Research, Mary Anne Layden, Ph.D., wrote:

Rape pornography teaches men that when a woman says no, the man does not need to stop. So a man may learn that there is no need to pay attention to a woman who is resisting, crying, screaming, struggling, or saying no, because ultimately she wants it and will enjoy it. He can conclude that her resistance is a sham and is part of a sex dance that leads to orgasm. He may assume that even her resistance is sexy and sexually arousing because it is part of the sexual template.

In other words, pornography makes violence sexy.

According to a study by Millburm, Mather and Conrad, in 2000 even “non-violent” porn objectifies and degrades women in a way that leads to a male user’s increased likelihood of believing victims of rape “got what they wanted.”

The recent scandal surrounding Deen ought to serve as a wake up call to the reporters who are working so hard to praise porn in efforts to be “hip” or “edgy.” Pornography is by nature an exploitive and harmful industry that is linked to increases in sexual violence, and it must be publicly regarded as such.

No one deserves to be exploited or abused. And no industry that glamorizes, or contributes to, exploitation should be tolerated.


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Haley McNamara (Halverson)

Vice President and Director of the International Centre on Sexual Exploitation

Haley McNamara (formerly Halverson) is the Director of the International Centre on Sexual Exploitation in the UK, and a Vice President at the U.S. based National Center on Sexual Exploitation. She leads international efforts and joint campaigns to improve policies and education among global governing bodies, citizenry, and corporations regarding the full web of sexual exploitation issues. Her advocacy work has contributed to policy improvements in social media, online advertising, retail, and hotel industries. She has advocated at the United Nations, led international coalition campaigns, presented to Danish, Croatian and Rwandan government officials, and more

She is a former member of the Washington DC Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect. This Committee advises DC Mayor Muriel Bowser on the multi-faceted continuum of the District of Columbia’s child welfare services, including prevention, early intervention, treatment, and sources of permanency.

Haley regularly speaks and writes on topics including child sexual abuse, sex trafficking, prostitution, sexual objectification, the exploitation of males, and more. She has presented before officials at the United Nations, as well as at several national symposia before influencers from the Department of Justice, Department of Health and Human Services, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Croatian government officials. She has provided training to Arlington County Child & Family Services on the social media grooming, recruitment, and advertising for sex trafficking. She has a Master of Arts in Government from Johns Hopkins University where she received honors for her thesis regarding the online commercial sexual exploitation marketplace.

Previously, Haley served for two years as Director of Communications for the National Center on Sexual Exploitation where she oversaw strategic messaging development, press outreach, email marketing, and social media marketing.

Prior to working at NCOSE, Haley wrote for a cultural media outlet. Haley graduated from Hillsdale College (summa cum laude) with a double major, and conducted a senior thesis on the abolitionist argument regarding prostitution. During her studies, she studied abroad at Oxford University and established a background in policy research through several internships in the DC area.

Haley has appeared on, or been quoted in, several outlets including the New York Times, NBC’s The Today Show, BBC News, New York Post, USA Today, Chicago Tribune, Fox News, San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, Yahoo News, Voice of America, Dr. Drew Midday Live, The DeMaio Report, the New York Daily News, the Washington Examiner, USA Radio Network, the Washington Times, CBC News, The Rod Arquette Show, The Detroit News, Lifezette, The Christian Post, Lifeline with Neil Boron, EWTN News Nightly, KCBS San Francisco Radio, LifeSiteNews, The Drew Mariano Show on Relevant Radio, News Talk KGVO, and American Family News.

She has written op-eds for the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, FoxNews.com, Washington Examiner, Townhall.com, Darling Magazine, the Daytona-Beach News Journal, and has been published in the Journal of Internet Law and the journal Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and ViolenceShe has also contributed to a digital middle school curriculum regarding the links between sex trafficking and pornography as well as the public health impacts of sex trafficking.

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