September 11, 2018

Amazon Removes Books Glorifying Sexual Assault, Many Still Remain

Amazon recently removed 9 books from their online store by “pickup artist” Daryush “Roosh” Valizadeh. Valizadeh earns money through self-publishing books on Amazon describing his sexual encounters in foreign countries, including actual confessions of sexual assault and rape. These books are meant to serve as guides for men on how to “pickup” women.

In today’s #MeToo culture, we cannot turn a blind eye to content openly promoting sexual harassment, abuse, and degradation of women. Unfortunately, even after removing these books, Amazon continues to sell content promoting and glorifying sexual assault and abuse,” said Dawn Hawkins, Executive Director of the National Center on Sexual Exploitation.

.@amazon Please stop the sale of books and products that promote the degradation of women and enforce #MeToo culture. Click To Tweet

Amazon removed 9 books by the author from their store, but 16 of the author’s books promoting sexual entitlement remain. Amazon earned a spot on our 2018 Dirty Dozen Listwhich names 12 mainstream facilitators of sexual exploitation, for facilitating sexual exploitation through the sale of products sexualizing children and commoditizing/degrading women. These items include child-like sex dolls, child nudity photography books, and books serving as guides for sexual assault or sex trafficking. More information about this issue can be found on our Amazon page.

“Because Amazon is free to remove any content that does not follow their terms and conditions, we urge Amazon to make the correct decision and further remove all content sexualizing women and children,” Hawkins concluded.

You can take action by emailing Amazon about sexually exploitive content they sell:

National Center on Sexual Exploitation

Founded in 1962, the National Center on Sexual Exploitation (NCOSE) is the leading national organization exposing the links between all forms of sexual exploitation such as child sexual abuse, prostitution, sex trafficking and the public health crisis of pornography.

Further Reading